mmol/L To mEq/L Calculator: Convert mmol/L To mEq/L Online

In a lot of cases, mmol/L to mEq/L conversion (millimoles per liter to milliequivalents per liter) is really simple (K+, Na+). When we are dealing with multivalent ions (such as Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe3+) it becomes a bit more difficult. To help you out with all of these conversions, we created these 2 online tools:

  1. mmol/L to mEq/L calculator. Here, you just insert mmol/L and ion valence/charge (K+ = 1, Ca2+ = 2, Fe3+ = 3), and you get mEq/L right away.
  2. mmol/L to mEq/L conversion charts (5 of them). We converted 1-500 mmol/L to mEq/L for 5 different ions (potassium (K+), sodium (Na+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and iron (Fe3+)), and summarized all the results in 5 conversion charts for quick use.

Here is how ion valence (ion charge) affects the mmol/L to mEq/L conversion:

  • 1 mmol/L of potassium ions (in potassium chloride (KCl), for example) is equal to 1 mEq/L, because potassium is a 1-valent ion (K+).
  • 1 mmol/L of calcium ions (in calcium gluconate (C12H22CaO14, for example) is equal to 2 mEq/L (since Ca2+ is a 2-valent ion).
  • 1 mmol/L of iron ions (3-valent) is equal to 3 mEq/L.

The calculator takes all this into account, as well as the 5 conversion charts (below the calculator). Let’s start with the calculator:

 

Let’s solve one example to illustrate how this online calculator works: How many mEq/L are in 40 mmol/L of potassium chloride (KCl)?

We know the mmol/L concentration, and we also know that potassium (K+) is a 1-valent ion. We insert ’40’ in the mmol/L field, slide the ion charge slider to ‘1’, and we get this result (screenshot):

mmol l to meq l conversion for potassium chloride

We can immediately see that 40 mmol/L of potassium chloride (KCl) is equal to 40 mEq/L. This is the simplest conversion because we can convert 1-to-to (since we have 1-valent K+ ions in KCl). By the way, if you need this conversion in reverse – mEq/L to mmol/L – you can check out a similar mEq/L to mmol/L calculator here.

If, on the other hand, we would have 40 mmol/L of calcium ions (Ca2+ is calcium gluconate, for example), these 40 mmol/L would convert to 80 mEq/L because calcium ions are 2-valent ions (you can try this conversion with the calculator above, just slide the ion charge slider to ‘2’).

Let’s have a look at the math behind this conversion:

mmol/L to mEq/L Formula

In order to convert mmol/L to mEq/L, we have to multiply mmol/L by ion charge (absolute value of the charge, it doesn’t matter is we have -1 or +1, or -2 or +2 charge). We can write this in the following mmol/L to mEq/L equation:

mEq/L = mmol/L × ABS (Ion Charge)

Quick Example: How many mEq/L are in 20 mmol/L of calcium gluconate?

We will use the equation above to solve this. We know we have 20 mmol/L, and calcium ions (Ca2+) have an ion charge of 2. Let’s put these two numbers in the equation and calculate the resulting mEq/L like this:

mEq/L (20 mmol/L, Ca2+) = 20 mmol/L × 2 = 40 mEq/L

This is just one example. We made a number of such calculations to create 5 conversion charts (for K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Fe3+). Here are the 1-500 mmol/L conversion to mEq/L for these key electrolytes:

1. Potassium mmol/L To mEq/L Chart (K+)

Potassium is a 1-valent ion, thus we can simply apply 1-to-1 conversion. Here is the potassium conversion chart:

Potassium mmol/L (K+): Potassium mEq/L:
1 mmol/L K+ 1 mEq/L
2 mmol/L K+ 2 mEq/L
3 mmol/L K+ 3 mEq/L
4 mmol/L K+ 4 mEq/L
5 mmol/L K+ 5 mEq/L
10 mmol/L K+ 10 mEq/L
20 mmol/L K+ 20 mEq/L
30 mmol/L K+ 30 mEq/L
40 mmol/L K+ 40 mEq/L
50 mmol/L K+ 50 mEq/L
60 mmol/L K+ 60 mEq/L
70 mmol/L K+ 70 mEq/L
80 mmol/L K+ 80 mEq/L
90 mmol/L K+ 90 mEq/L
100 mmol/L K+ 100 mEq/L
150 mmol/L K+ 150 mEq/L
200 mmol/L K+ 200 mEq/L
250 mmol/L K+ 250 mEq/L
300 mmol/L K+ 300 mEq/L
350 mmol/L K+ 350 mEq/L
400 mmol/L K+ 400 mEq/L
450 mmol/L K+ 450 mEq/L
500 mmol/L K+ 500 mEq/L

Examples of molecules that contain potassium ions include potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium hydroxide (KOH). Thus, we can see that 100 mmol/L of potassium chloride is equal to 100 mEq/L, for example.

2. Sodium mmol/L To mEq/L Chart (Na+)

Sodium is also a 1-to-1 conversion. Examples of molecules that include sodium ions are sodium chloride (NaCl) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Here is the 2nd conversion chart:

Sodium mmol/L (Na+): Sodium mEq/L:
1 mmol/L Na+ 1 mEq/L
2 mmol/L Na+ 2 mEq/L
3 mmol/L Na+ 3 mEq/L
4 mmol/L Na+ 4 mEq/L
5 mmol/L Na+ 5 mEq/L
10 mmol/L Na+ 10 mEq/L
20 mmol/L Na+ 20 mEq/L
30 mmol/L Na+ 30 mEq/L
40 mmol/L Na+ 40 mEq/L
50 mmol/L Na+ 50 mEq/L
60 mmol/L Na+ 60 mEq/L
70 mmol/L Na+ 70 mEq/L
80 mmol/L Na+ 80 mEq/L
90 mmol/L Na+ 90 mEq/L
100 mmol/L Na+ 100 mEq/L
150 mmol/L Na+ 150 mEq/L
200 mmol/L Na+ 200 mEq/L
250 mmol/L Na+ 250 mEq/L
300 mmol/L Na+ 300 mEq/L
350 mmol/L Na+ 350 mEq/L
400 mmol/L Na+ 400 mEq/L
450mmol/L Na+ 450 mEq/L
500 mmol/L Na+ 500 mEq/L

3. Calcium mmol/L To mEq/L Chart (Ca2+)

With calcium molecules (such as calcium gluconate), we have to be careful because Ca2+ are 2-valent ions, and thus we can’t apply the 1-to-1 conversion. Rather, we have to use 1-to-2 conversion, as evident in the conversion chart:

Calcium mmol/L (Ca2+): Calcium mEq/L:
1 mmol/L Ca2+ 2 mEq/L
2 mmol/L Ca2+ 4 mEq/L
3 mmol/L Ca2+ 6 mEq/L
4 mmol/L Ca2+ 8 mEq/L
5 mmol/L Ca2+ 10 mEq/L
10 mmol/L Ca2+ 20 mEq/L
20 mmol/L Ca2+ 40 mEq/L
30 mmol/L Ca2+ 60 mEq/L
40 mmol/L Ca2+ 80 mEq/L
50 mmol/L Ca2+ 100 mEq/L
60 mmol/L Ca2+ 120 mEq/L
70 mmol/L Ca2+ 140 mEq/L
80 mmol/L Ca2+ 160 mEq/L
90 mmol/L Ca2+ 180 mEq/L
100 mmol/L Ca2+ 200 mEq/L
150 mmol/L Ca2+ 300 mEq/L
200 mmol/L Ca2+ 400 mEq/L
250 mmol/L Ca2+ 500 mEq/L
300 mmol/L Ca2+ 600 mEq/L
350 mmol/L Ca2+ 700 mEq/L
400 mmol/L Ca2+ 800 mEq/L
450 mmol/L Ca2+ 900 mEq/L
500 mmol/L Ca2+ 1000 mEq/L

4. Magnesium mmol/L To mEq/L Chart (Mg2+)

mmol/L of magnesium converts to mEq/L in the same quantitative manner as calcium. Here is the 4th conversion chart:

Magnesium mmol/L (Mg2+): Magnesium mEq/L:
1 mmol/L Mg2+ 2 mEq/L
2 mmol/L Mg2+ 4 mEq/L
3 mmol/L Mg2+ 6 mEq/L
4 mmol/L Mg2+ 8 mEq/L
5 mmol/L Mg2+ 10 mEq/L
10 mmol/L Mg2+ 20 mEq/L
20 mmol/L Mg2+ 40 mEq/L
30 mmol/L Mg2+ 60 mEq/L
40 mmol/L Mg2+ 80 mEq/L
50 mmol/L Mg2+ 100 mEq/L
60 mmol/L Mg2+ 120 mEq/L
70 mmol/L Mg2+ 140 mEq/L
80 mmol/L Mg2+ 160 mEq/L
90 mmol/L Mg2+ 180 mEq/L
100 mmol/L Mg2+ 200 mEq/L
150 mmol/L Mg2+ 300 mEq/L
200 mmol/L Mg2+ 400 mEq/L
250 mmol/L Mg2+ 500 mEq/L
300 mmol/L Mg2+ 600 mEq/L
350 mmol/L Mg2+ 700 mEq/L
400 mmol/L Mg2+ 800 mEq/L
450 mmol/L Mg2+ 900 mEq/L
500 mmol/L Mg2+ 1000 mEq/L

5. Iron mmol/L To mEq/L Chart (Fe3+)

Iron is one of a few 3-valent ions. Thus we have a 1-to-3 mmol/L to mEq/L conversion here:

Iron mmol/L (Fe3+): Iron mEq/L:
1 mmol/L Fe3+ 3 mEq/L
2 mmol/L Fe3+ 6 mEq/L
3 mmol/L Fe3+ 9 mEq/L
4 mmol/L Fe3+ 12 mEq/L
5 mmol/L Fe3+ 15 mEq/L
10 mmol/L Fe3+ 30 mEq/L
20 mmol/L Fe3+ 60 mEq/L
30 mmol/L Fe3+ 90 mEq/L
40 mmol/L Fe3+ 120 mEq/L
50 mmol/L Fe3+ 150 mEq/L
60 mmol/L Fe3+ 180 mEq/L
70 mmol/L Fe3+ 210 mEq/L
80 mmol/L Fe3+ 240 mEq/L
90 mmol/L Fe3+ 270 mEq/L
100 mmol/L Fe3+ 300 mEq/L
150 mmol/L Fe3+ 450 mEq/L
200 mmol/L Fe3+ 600 mEq/L
250 mmol/L Fe3+ 750 mEq/L
300 mmol/L Fe3+ 900 mEq/L
350 mmol/L Fe3+ 1050 mEq/L
400 mmol/L Fe3+ 1200 mEq/L
450 mmol/L Fe3+ 1350 mEq/L
500 mmol/L Fe3+ 1500 mEq/L

We hope the calculator and these charts serve you well when you need to convert mmol/L to mEq/L. If you have any questions or would like for us to help you, you can use the comment section below, gives us a few numbers and chemical substance, and we can help you out.

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